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The latest of the OxPol blog special series

So far, it has been a good year for the Oxford University Politics Blog. We have launched three new special series (Brexit, Advances in Political Science Methods, and Politike), broke the 3,200-followers-barrier on Twitter, and welcomed more than 300 visitors per day on average.

The blog now hosts more than 800 articles on topics ranging from Daesh to Brazil’s recent political turmoil, and from devolution in the UK to the US primaries.

Advances in Political Science Methods

Our latest series, Advances in Political Science Methods, is co-hosted by the Oxford University Politics Blog and the Oxford Q-Step Centre. And, it is all about “methods”.  

Big data, computer science, experimental methods, and computational text analysis are part of an ever-growing range of methods embraced by political science. As we expand our methodological horizons, the nature, scope, and focus of the questions we investigate will change.

The first article in the series discusses the lessons that political scientists can draw from “Big Data”. Reaching over 700 hits in a week, this post shows how we can use Big Data to engage with some of the biggest questions in political science, and how it can improve our research.

For Advances in Political Science Methods, we welcome contributions on statistics, software, programming, experimental research design, and many other topics. Learn more at: http://blog.politics.ox.ac.uk/advances-in-political-science-methods/

Brexit

Our Brexit series has been running since September 2015 and now features articles on immigration, Euroscepticism in the Conservative party, legal implications for the UK, and the impact of a potential Brexit on Britain’s health care system.

The referendum, set for 23rd June 2016, raises many important questions for the United Kingdom. Will David Cameron be able to negotiate a “New Deal” for his country before June 2016? How will his diplomacy affect Britain’s relationship with its European partners? Is a referendum of this kind democratic? And, what would a British exit from the EU—a “Brexit”—look like?

We invite contributions that engage with these questions, and many others. Learn more at: http://blog.politics.ox.ac.uk/brexit/

Politike

OxPol has recently launched a series in collaboration with Politikea Brazilian website associated with the magazine CartaCapital. Politike focuses on the analysis of international affairs and human rights issues, especially those of the Global South. CartaCapital is one of the most popular political magazines in Brazil, with its website registering over 6.5 million monthly page views.

The series already boasts three articles on Brazil’s recent political troubles that are certainly worth a read. Learn more at: http://blog.politics.ox.ac.uk/politike-series/.

Submit your article to OxPol

We are always looking for new material. Please email your article to niels.goet@politics.ox.ac.uk or to alexander.ewing@politics.ox.ac.uk.

Looking for inspiration? Have a look at our special series page (http://blog.politics.ox.ac.uk/series/) to see the great variety of topics that our contributors write on.