Kathryn Nwajiaku

Kathryn Nwajiaku

Post:
Department Visiting Research Fellow
Visiting:
01 October 2019 until 30 June 2020
Email:
kathryn.nwajiaku@politics.ox.ac.uk
Office Address:
Department of Politics and International Relations, Manor Road, Oxford. OX1 3UQ

Dr Kathryn Nwajiaku-Dahou is a senior independent expert on responsible business and peace in Africa, with other twenty years’ experience working in International Development for governments (UK, Ireland), NGOs (Oxfam), multilateral institutions (UN, OECD, African Development Bank) and more recently, the private sector. She currently chairs the Expert Working Group of the Bayelsa State Oil and Environmental Commission, an international Commission of Inquiry into the effects of oil and gas pollution in Nigeria’s largest oil producing state. She returns to DPIR, where she completed her ESRC-funded DPhil in politics (Nuffield College) in 2005 (‘The Politics of Oil and Identity Transformation in Nigeria: The case of the Ijaw of the Niger Delta’) and two ESRC postdoctoral fellowships (2006, 2009-2012 (‘Being and Becoming Ethnic in Europe and Africa), which have been the subject of publications and prizes, including the Ruth First Prize for Best African Academic Article in 2012. Kathryn recently completed a five year posting as a policy advisor on conflict at the OECD, where she led the International Dialogue on Peacebuilding and Statebuilding secretariat, a partnership between OECD countries and non-OECD countries emerging from conflict. At the OECD, in addition to co-authoring and overseeing the production of the ‘States of Fragility Report’ (2015), she spearheaded a responsible business and peace initiative convening development practitioners and institutional investors around OECD guidelines. She returns to DPIR to, reflect on the experience of developing policy norms, facilitating dialogue and fostering international compliance and how this gets translated as practice in extractive sites. This work sits within Professor Soares de Oliveira area of research on the geopolitics of energy and international political economy, especially in the fields of natural resource extraction. It also relates to work currently being developed within the Oxford Martin School on African Governance looking at current political and economic responses to the post-2014 reality for resource-rich economies, such as Angola and Nigeria, and what this will mean for the quest for economic diversification and the lessening of resource dependence in these economies.